Supportive Care

San Francisco, CA—Many patients with advanced melanoma or advanced lung cancer have benefited from treatment with checkpoint inhibitors, which have helped extend survival to previously unthinkable lengths. Although the impression is that checkpoint inhibitors are free of adverse events, in reality, clinicians strive daily to balance the efficacy and toxicity of these treatments.

Adelaide, Australia—Prophylactic probiotics can potentially prevent radiation enteropathy, according to research presented by Matthew A. Ciorba, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Washing­ton Uni­versity School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, at the 2016 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer.

Adelaide, Australia—SGX942, a novel agent that is first in its class, decreased the incidence of severe oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing chemoradiation, according to new research led by Oreola Donini, PhD, Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer, Soligenix, Princeton, NJ, and Mahesh R. Kudrimoti, MD, Professor of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington.

Delirium is an exceedingly prevalent syndrome among patients with cancer, but is underrecognized and undertreated, according to Alan Valentine, MD, Chair, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, and Darryl Etter, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist, VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, at a webinar hosted by the American Psychosocial Oncology Society in July 2016.

Adelaide, Australia—Nausea is part of a symptom cluster associated with chemotherapy, but the experience of nausea may be a symptom cluster in and of itself, according to a study presented by Ian Olver, MD, President of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC), Director of the Sansom Institute for Health Research, and Professor of Translational Cancer Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, at the 2016 MASCC/International Society of Oral Oncology Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer.

Adelaide, Australia—Stomatitis is a dose-limiting toxicity associated with the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, but new treatments can improve quality of life for patients suffering from this often debilitating condition, according to data presented at the 2016 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer.

A review of the incidence and management of hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin revealed that many patients are unnecessarily taken off this important drug. Most reactions are mild, and most patients can be successfully rechallenged with the drug, according to a study presented at the 2016 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium by Kelly Markey, PharmD, of Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL.

For the treatment of radiodermatitis, a skin product containing calendula (a type of marigold) resulted in faster healing than Aquaphor plus aloe vera gel, according to interim results of a comparative study presented as a poster at the Oncology Nursing Society 41st Annual Congress.

Multivitamin supplement use was associated with a reduction in symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in a subanalysis of the SWOG S0221 trial. Patients who were using multivitamins before chemotherapy had 40% less neuropathy, and those using them during or after treatment had a 23% reduced risk.

This section provides a quick update of symptomatic conditions in oncology and their management. Readers are invited to submit brief updates following the guidelines at http://www.JHOPonline.com.
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