Supportive Care

The Cancer Support Community (CSC) has developed the Cancer Experience Registry, which is a unique resource that provides evidence-based data about the emotional, social, physical, and financial issues patients and caregivers face.
Hypercalcemia is defined as a condition in which the serum calcium level is >10.5 mg/dL (the upper limit of normal) or the ionized calcium level exceeds 5.6 mg/dL. The consequences of abnormally high serum calcium can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
Austin, TX-Three advanced azole agents are now being used to treat invasive aspergillosis, and strengths and weaknesses exist for each of them, according to research presented by James S. Lewis II, PharmD, at the 11th annual Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association conference.
The severity and impact of nausea and vomiting (NV) on patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy is greater than estimated by oncology physicians and nurses, according to research presented by Cheryl Vidall at the 2015 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer.
Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a common distressing symptom in patients with cancer who are taking opioids.
Results from a new study provide reassurance to women with cancer during pregnancy that they can be safely treated during the second or third trimester with chemotherapy/radiation without compromising their unborn child.
This section provides a quick update of symptomatic conditions in oncology and their management. Readers are invited to submit brief updates following the guidelines provided within.
The severity and impact of nausea and vomiting (NV) on patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy is greater than estimated by oncology physicians and nurses, according to research presented by Cheryl Vidall at the 2015 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology International Symposium on Supportive Care in Cancer.
Approximately 40% of patients treated with anthracyclines are still not receiving National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline–adherent prophylaxis for chemotherapy-induced vomiting.
Cancer in women ages 15 to 19 years is relatively rare, but when it occurs, menstruation can result in clinically significant complications. During the care of hematologic malignancies, heavy menstrual bleeding in this patient population is commonly correlated with thrombocytopenia. The effects of chemotherapy, radiation, or bone marrow transplantation are also potential secondary causes of therapy-induced thrombocytopenia, leading to excessive menstrual bleeding.
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