Stay Up
to Date
Stay Up
to Date
Breaking News,
Updates, & More
Breaking News,
Updates, & More
Click Here to
Subscribe
Click Here to
Subscribe

Genitourinary Cancers

Abiraterone acetate is a novel antiandrogen agent that has recently received an expanded indication for treatment in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).
In March, the National Compre-hensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for genetic/familial high-risk assessment for breast and ovarian cancers were updated.

Two studies presented at the 2012 American Society of Clinical On­cology (ASCO) Annual Meet­ing suggested that abiraterone acetate (AA; Zytiga), an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor,1 has the potential to be used earlier in the course of prostate cancer than its current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indication (ie, after failure of chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer [CRPC]).

The novel agent MDV3100 prolonged survival in men with castration- resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who progressed on treatment with docetaxel, according to results of the large phase 3 AFFIRM trial reported at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco, California.

Although the increased incidence of bladder cancer (BC) has softened in recent years, proposed to be due in part to smoking cessation strategies, BC remains a significant healthcare problem with high recurrence rates.1,2 Currently, there is inadequate evidence that screening for BC in the asymptomatic population promotes improved overall morbidity or mortality.3 Despite this current state of the science, there is great interest in bettering the gold standard for early diagnosis—cystoscopy, cytology, and imaging—as these are expensive, uncomfortable, and not

Exercise has been shown to reduce recurrence in men with prostate cancer, according to several studies. A new study shows that vigorous exercise for 1 hour 3 times per week upregulates the expression of genes that are unfavorable to cancer, providing a potential explanation for the mechanism by which exercise has anticancer effects.

Worldwide, there are approximately 500,000 men diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, and in those men prostate cancer is the third most common type of malignancy, surpassed only by cancer of the lung and stomach.1 Other than nonmelanoma skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in the United States.2 There is disparity in risk of prostate cancer diagnosis between races.

In a randomized phase 2 study of patients with metastatic breast cancer, peripheral neuropathy was less likely to occur in patients receiving eribulin mesylate than with ixabepilone.

“Peripheral neuropathy is a big problem in the treatment of breast cancer. Across the spectrum, patients have it, and we don’t know how to treat it,” said Linda T. Vahdat, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, who presented the study at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

An investigational alpha-pharmaceutical not only prevented skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with prostate cancer with bone metastases in a phase 3 study presented at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, but it also improved overall survival.

Page 4 of 6
Results 31 - 40 of 54