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There is nothing that pulls at my heart strings more than the sight of a young child dealing with a diagnosis of cancer. This issue of Conquering the Cancer Care Continuum™ focuses on pediatric cancer care, a challenging area of oncology management, but one in which amazing progress is being made.
The birth of the pediatric hematology/oncology specialty can be traced back to the early part of the 20th century, when pediatricians began describing hematologic abnormalities in infants and children.
As a practitioner in adult oncology, it is only on rare occasions that I see pediatric patients managed in our clinic. Generally speaking, such patients seen in this setting are mid-adolescents with diagnoses of Hodgkin lymphoma who are being treated with a standard adult regimen.
Cure rates for children with cancer now exceed 80% in high-income countries (HIC), but several challenges remain.
We have been hearing about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for quite a while. However, many are still confused as to what this law is trying to accomplish and how it will benefit various populations of patients across the United States.
In 2010, Congress passed (and the President signed into law) comprehensive healthcare legislation called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), or as it is more commonly known, the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
In the spring of 2008, while I was finishing my oncology pharmacy residency training, I had the opportunity to spend a month in a prominent urban hospital very well known for its indigent patient population.
The Affordable Care Act (ACA), officially called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which began implementation in March 2010 and will not be fully implemented until 2018, has impacted oncology care in both positive and negative ways.
Among the various types of treatment that a patient with cancer may undergo, chemotherapy is associated with the greatest concerns with respect to side effects. Although patients may comprehend the importance of receiving chemotherapy as a key component of their treatment plan, the fear of adverse events (AEs) is always foremost on their minds.
It is inevitable that patients with cancer will experience some side effects associated with treatment. Recommendations for managing and minimizing these complications are critical to patients’ well-being and can impact overall clinical outcomes.
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