Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy
Triple-negative breast cancer is considered one of the most difficult to treat breast cancers, with few treatment options, but finally a breakthrough study shows progress by extending patient survival.
Combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in treatment-naïve patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with a TKI alone.
The combination of immunotherapy with nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) may soon represent a new first-line treatment option in patients with early-stage metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) tumors.
Combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in treatment-naïve patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with a TKI alone.
The combination of immunotherapy with nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) may soon represent a new first-line treatment option in patients with early-stage metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) tumors. Two studies presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress demonstrated the efficacy of this combination in this patient population.
Learning how to activate and harness the immune system—the body’s built-in defense against disease—has brought the field of oncology to the cusp of a cure for at least some, if not many, types of cancer, according to an international authority in immuno-oncology.
The CAR product “is essentially an autologous T-cell, which is transduced using a lentiviral encoding vector for a CAR, which is specific to human BCMA,” said Dr Raje. The co-stimulatory domain that includes 4-1BB is believed to be associated with durable CAR T-cell persistence compared with the CD28 co-stimulatory domain.
Learning how to activate and harness the immune system—the body’s built-in defense against disease—has brought the field of oncology to the cusp of a cure for at least some, if not many, types of cancer, according to an international authority in immuno-oncology.
The NCCN’s first guideline for side effects from immunotherapy recognizes a new spectrum of events in patients who are receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy has had excellent results in late-stage leukemia and varying degrees of success in some other hematologic cancers, but thus far, solid tumors have not responded to this therapy.

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