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Rearrangement during transfection (RET) fusions can result in gain- or loss-of-function mutations and unchecked cellular proliferation. Although RET fusions are present in only a small percentage of cases of non–small-cell lung cancer, evidence shows they may be meaningful drug targets.
There are several oncogenic driver mutations that are actionable for treatment in cases of NSCLC. Evidence has shown that molecularly targeted approaches can result in positive outcomes for patients with NSCLC, underscoring the importance of research into biomarker testing and molecular profiling.
Four retrospective studies on treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with NSCLC have shown only limited clinical benefit in patients with RET-rearranged lung cancer.
Ongoing trials of two recently approved RET inhibitors, pralsetinib and selpercatinib, are producing encouraging safety and efficacy data in patients with RET fusion–positive NSCLC.
Although researchers have made great advances in NSCLC screening, diagnosis, and treatment, there remain several areas of unmet need, including the development of individual risk-based screening criteria, research into optimal biopsy types for molecular profiling, and greater focus on effective side-effect management plans for patients on multimedication regimens.
In the phase 2 OVARIO study, median progression-free survival has not yet been reached in women with advanced ovarian cancer who are being treated with the combination of niraparib and bevacizumab after response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. The combination did not appear to cause cumulative toxicities.
An all-oral regimen in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer did not show superiority to platinum-based regimens on the outcome of progression-free survival.
In a meta-analysis of 7 large randomized clinical trials, PARP inhibitors were not significantly more likely to cause secondary hematologic malignancies compared with control groups.
A pooled analysis of 2 studies using rucaparib for the treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade ovarian cancer supported the approved starting dose of 600 mg twice daily.
A global phase 3 randomized study is currently enrolling patients with stage III or IV high-grade nonmucinous epithelial ovarian cancer to assess the efficacy of an investigational anti–PD-1 humanized monoclonal antibody plus standard of care as first-line treatment and maintenance. The primary outcome measure is progression-free survival.
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