Multiple Myeloma

In the CHAMPION-1 study, patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and 1 to 3 previous regimens who received once-weekly carfilzomib had a 77% overall response rate and a median PFS of 12.6 months.
Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow that often leads to bone destruction and bone marrow failure. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 30,280 new cases of multiple myeloma will be diagnosed in 2017, and 12,590 deaths will be attributed to the disease. In the past 20 years, mortality rates associated with multiple myeloma have declined. Novel therapies, as well as improvements in autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) procedures and supportive care, have contributed to extended survival for patients with this malignancy.

An interrupted time-series analysis by David Merola, PharmD candidate, Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA, and colleagues, showed a significant increase in missed workdays per month after the initial diagnosis of multiple myeloma among patients who received oral or injectable cancer therapy.

According to the results of an open-label, phase 1b study presented at ASCO 2017, induction therapy with the KRd regimen was well-tolerated, and the overall safety profile was consistent with previous reports for KRd, with no additional toxicity observed with the addition of daratumumab.
Historically, therapies for patients with MM included high-dose dexamethasone, alkylating agents, and autologous stem cell transplantation. In the late 1990s, a new era in myeloma treatment began with the introduction of the immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide, followed by subsequent development of the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib, and the next-generation IMiDs lenalidomide and pomalidomide.
Although the 5-year survival rate for multiple myeloma is less than 50%, this type of cancer has witnessed a resurgence of drug therapies.

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