Drug Updates

Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) represents a group of heterogeneous cancers that originate in the bile ducts that connect the liver and gallbladder to the small intestine. Although the exact prevalence of CCA is unknown, CCA is a rare cancer; approximately 8000 new cases of CCA are diagnosed annually in the United States. Read More ›

  • Brukinsa Receives Accelerated FDA Approval for Mantle-Cell Lymphoma
  • Ziextenzo Third Biosimilar to Neulasta Approved for Febrile Neutropenia
  • Tecentriq Approved with Chemotherapy for First-Line Treatment of Metastatic NSCLC without EGFR or ALK Mutations
  • FDA Approves Calquence for Adults with CLL or SL
  • Zejula Receives FDA Approval for HRD-Positive Advanced Ovarian Cancer
Read More ›

  • Teva Will Resume Production of Vincristine in Response to Shortage
  • FDA Fast-Tracks Opdivo plus Yervoy Regimen for Treatment of Advanced Liver Cancer
  • FDA Grants Accelerated Approval to Brukinsa for Patients with Mantle-Cell Lymphoma
Read More ›

Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), also known as carcinoids and islet-cell tumors, are tumors of the neuroendocrine cells that occur in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. GEP-NETs are heterogeneous and complex. Although relatively rare, GEP-NETs are more common than other tumors of the GI tract, including stomach and pancreatic carcinomas combined. Read More ›

Prostate cancer, the second most common type of cancer in men, is expected to affect 11.6% of all men during their lifetime. In fact, more than 3 million men in the United States are living with prostate cancer. It is estimated that in 2017, 161,360 men were newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 26,730 men died from the disease. Read More ›

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare but deadly cancer. In 2018, approximately 19,500 new cases of AML were estimated to be diagnosed in the United States and more than 10,600 people to die from the disease. Clinical trials data show that up to 70% of adults with AML have disease that completely responds to initial treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, the 3-year survival rate for patients with AML remains poor, at approximately 25%. Read More ›

Two human genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2), produce proteins that block the growth of cancer, such as breast or ovarian cancer. These proteins ensure the stability of each cell’s genetic material and help to repair damaged DNA. A mutation in either BRCA results in these proteins not functioning correctly. Specifically, DNA damage may not be repaired effectively, which can lead to cancer. Read More ›

Gene mutations or rearrangements in the tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases are emerging as an important driver of cancer-cell growth in a wide range of cancers. Research has shown that neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase (NTRK) genes, which encode for TRK proteins, can fuse abnormally to other genes and enhance cell signals that support tumor growth. NTRK gene fusions are found in a variety of tumor types, including soft-tissue sarcoma, salivary gland cancer, infantile fibro­sarcoma, thyroid cancer, and lung cancer. Read More ›

Febrile neutropenia is a serious complication of cancer chemotherapy that can require treatment delays and chemotherapy dose reductions, which compromise the efficacy of treatment. Among patients with cancer who are receiving chemotherapy, approximately 1% have febrile neutropenia. This condition affects patient morbidity and mortality and its clinical management requires significant healthcare resources. Read More ›

Quizartinib Combinations Show High Activity in Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia with FLT3 Mutation

The combination of the investigational drug quizartinib plus azacitidine (Vidaza) or low-dose cytarabine has substantial activity in patients with myeloid leukemias and FLT3 mutations.

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